Monday, December 10, 2018

New Beginnings

In the process of New Beginnings, the victim in us fights for survival each time we desire to do something different. Whenever we seek change, the victim in us cries for others' approval of our actions. Unfortunately, it's this dependency on others that fosters deep-seated doubts about letting go of toxic relationships.

Nevertheless, there are times in our lives when we must begin anew. Whenever we feel this way, we must be willing  to let go of toxic relationships and create new, non-toxic ones. These are the times to trust our actions and stop asking others for their approval.

Regardless of the intensity of our desires for change, by holding on to what others have taught us, make us victims of their beliefs and values. All that we know about relationship-building come from beliefs and values absolving us of personal responsibility for the outcome of our relationships..

Whenever we begin new relationships, we enter into them without first having done the work to cleanse our minds of the toxicity from the last one. Unfortunately, this awareness-of-being prevents organic change. Nevertheless, our awareness-of-being continues to think of change or a new lifestyle from a toxic perspective.

In other words, we don't really know how to start over. So we continue to believe new experiences are actually new beginnings in consciousness.

Meanwhile, we continue to change our relationships with people rather than our awareness-of-being. The purpose of changing our lives is the recognition that new beginnings must come from a new, toxic-free, awareness-of-being.

The following passage from the book of Enlightenism assists with illuminating "New Beginnings":

     "The first and last ingredient of the formula is to live and embody your awareness-of-being. The sole purpose of Enlightenism work is to create a new awareness-of-being. This new awareness-of-being must be as toxic-free as possible. You now have the clarity to understand that your awareness-of-being determines not only what you think of yourself, but your actions."

                                                              "Enlightenism" by "Brother Malcolm" Kelly